A question about study

A place to discuss what it means to serve G-d for those who don't happen to be Jewish.

Hassidic Gentile? Ben/Bat Noach? Whatever you call yourself, you are welcome.
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Re: A question about study

Postby ess76 » Fri Jan 27, 2012 6:27 pm

steve wrote:Elazar, thanks for the essay.
Amazing Divine Provedence that you were also able to help me with good advice.
Hashem is good and does good.

Thank-you
Steve.

Of course! I hope everything by you is going well. If you ever need anything, feel free to shoot me an email, and I'll do my best to respond.

I'd also love to hear any feedback you may have about my paper. I'm still forming my thoughts on the issue, so hearing how other people react to it would be very helpful, and I'm sure you have a lot of insight to give.

Thanks,

Elazar
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Re: A question about study

Postby steve » Fri Feb 24, 2012 12:41 pm

Thanks Elazar,
I don't feel that I know enough to comment on your essay, but it was very interesting.

Thank-you.
Steve.
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Re: A question about study

Postby steve » Tue May 08, 2012 11:38 pm

The gate of repentance


It says in the gate of repentance that a person should desist from sin.

If a person asks for forgiveness then repeats the same sin it is disrespectful to G-d.

Should a person only ask forgiveness when he is absolutely sure that he will never repeat a sin ?
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Re: A question about study

Postby rivka » Wed May 09, 2012 5:19 am

steve wrote:Should a person only ask forgiveness when he is absolutely sure that he will never repeat a sin ?

There is no such thing. We are all human, and we are always at risk of slipping back into old behaviors.

But perhaps if one has strong doubts that he won't be able to refrain from repeating at the time he is repenting, he has not truly repented. Rambam talks about confessing without truly determining to not repeat the sin. He says it's like dipping in a mikvah while still clutching an impure insect in his hand.
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Re: A question about study

Postby Kira » Wed May 09, 2012 12:25 pm

R' Bachye is trying to motivate people to desist from sin, by adding the motivation of not being disrespectful to G-d.

It is also disrespectful to sin with the attitude of "G-d has to forgive me anyway on Yom Kippur". He doesn't.

However, asking forgiveness for something that you know you can't quite master is totally fine

-Kira
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Re: A question about study

Postby steve » Sat May 12, 2012 7:24 pm

Thanks Rivka,
I think its the gate of serving G-d that it says once you release the impure thing it is as if you had never sinned.
Thanks for reminding me.


Kira,
Thanks.
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Re: A question about study

Postby steve » Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:48 pm

The Gate of Humility (Gate 6)

My understanding of this gate is surrender to the will of G-d.

Is having ill feeling for any person arrogance ?
Is a person arrogant until they can accept everything that happens in life, with trust and acceptance ?

Indifference to praise or insult.
If someone praises me I should accept the praise and thank G-d. If someone hurts or insults me I should accept the hurt/insult and thank G-d, realising that it was G-d who sent the person to carry out his will.
Is this what is meant by indifference to praise or insult?
Would being happy with praise or angry at insult be arrogance?

Steve.
Last edited by steve on Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:25 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: A question about study

Postby steve » Fri Oct 26, 2012 11:32 am

Rabbi Yaakov Feldman of the Mussar institute has some very good recorded videos on the Duties of the Heart.

In the Gate of Humility he talks about the different kinds of surrender, some good some "bad"

The Rabbi talks about not surrendering to everyone's wishes ( giving in all the time/ becoming a door mat to others)

How should a person who realises that everything is G-d's will view the ( "giving in all the time" example) ?

Where does a person find the balance between Believing and accepting G-d's will and freewill ?

Thanks Steve
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Re: A question about study

Postby Hart60 » Sat Oct 27, 2012 7:29 pm

Hi Steve,
It's always good to please others and to do as much as we can to help others if the reasons are just, sometimes we are obliged to go out of our way to do so but never to the point that we feel we are being used.
The Holy Creator gave us free will so that we could express ourselves and not be autonomous robots.

Dan.
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Re: A question about study

Postby ess76 » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:47 am

steve wrote:The gate of repentance


It says in the gate of repentance that a person should desist from sin.

If a person asks for forgiveness then repeats the same sin it is disrespectful to G-d.

Should a person only ask forgiveness when he is absolutely sure that he will never repeat a sin ?

The question here is what our attitude is/should be. We are not praying to God to forgive our sins out of a feeling of guilt, and request to not be punished. That presupposes the notion of wrathful God whom we beg not to inflict pain on us.

Prayer and "Widduy" (confession) is FOR US, to stimulate mental processes that allow us to do real teshuva. Praying to God to forgive us for our sins is a necessary component for a person to acknowledge that what they did is wrong, and are now attempting to go onto the right path. It is essential that one do this while he is trying to change his ways. Crying out to God at this time is a way of encouraging an internal mental transformation of your very soul.

This is different from Widduy, which is a mitswath 'ase, to be done AFTER having completed full teshuva (repentance). Once you have "returned" to the straight path (rather than veering right or left), having finalized your internal transformation, you should express verbally the transgression that you did, as a way of formalizing your departure from that path, a "graduation" of the teshuva course, if you will. That transgression that you committed remains an integral part of **your personal journey**, like those of the 'avoth (Avraham, Yitshaq, and Ya'aqov). You, therefore, must hold onto the fact that you committed those 'averoth (transgressions), not as a "guilt-tripping," but as a recording of your personal journey with God. "Hattathi neghdi tamidh" (Tillim 72?) "My mistakes are before me always." This is the function of the widduy, to complete the teshuva process. Therefore, widduy for transgressions should continually be made, even years after you have already done full teshuva, in order to maintain your place against that path. Widduy, then, should NOT be done while still performing the transgression, i.e. prior to completing your teshuva. This is akin to someone who is "tovel wesherets biyadho," "immerses (in a miqwa) and a bug is in his hand," i.e. he seeks to purify himself via immersion in a miqwa while simultaneously holding onto the source of impurity.
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